57 Marketing Trends found for Regulation / USA


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EU Moves to Control US Tech Titans

Trend Summary: The European Union is girding its loins to rein in tech giants via copyright legislation.


The EU move is already sparking fierce debate, raising questions as to whether the proposed law will accomplish its goals. The fight already ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2018]

... pits major publishers, music companies and movie directors against the internet giants, among them Facebook Inc and Alphabet Inc.’s Google, as well as open-internet advocates and some small publishers.

Read the original unabridged WSJ.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7473

EU Puts the Squeeze on Tax Avoiding US Tech Titans

Trend Summary: The EU announced yesterday its intention to rein-in the alleged tax evasion excesses of US tech giants.


The European Union this week revealed that Apple Inc owes approximately €13bn [$14.5bn] in what it politely calls "uncollected taxes" over the past decade. The move represents a new high-water mark in the bloc’s efforts to rein in the ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2016]

... alleged tax-evasive excesses of American tech giants.

The EU's move is just the first shot in what is expected to be a busy autumn for European officials, who are pushing forward a raft of regulations and investigations aimed at altering the behavior of a cadre of US-based internet superpowers. The moves are supported by a host of players—from EU regulators in Brussels to a bevy of national authorities across the continent. They are targeting areas ranging from personal privacy to anti-competition issues.

In coming weeks, EU bodies plan to debate new telecom rules that could expand to cover services like WhatsApp, proposed legislation to push news aggregators to pay newspapers for showing snippets of content, and potential audiovisual rules that would force companies like Netflix Inc to finance European movies.

At the same time, authorities in capitals like Brussels, Paris and Berlin are pursuing investigations involving big companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook, concerning alleged tax avoidance, anticompetitive behavior and privacy concerns.

“It’s an avalanche coming,” says James Waterworth, vice president for Europe at the US-based Computer & Communications Industry Association, a lobby group that represents Amazon, Facebook, Google and Netflix. “There’s a political sense from some camps that these big, extraterritorial companies are getting away with things that need to be addressed.”

Read the original unabridged WSJ.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6969

US Senators Demand Action On Ad-Click Fraud

Trend Summary: Two US Democrat Senators are demanding assurances from the Federal Trade Commission that action be taken to eliminate ad-click fraud.


In a letter to the Federal Trade Commission [FTC], Democrat Senators Chuck Schumer and Mark Warner seek assurances about programs that enable hackers to seize control of multiple computers remotely, providing them with access to consumers' ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2016]

... personal information.

Messrs Schumer and Warner specifically request the FTC to provide details on what it's doing to crack down on ad-click fraud.

Say the duo: "These programs allow hackers to seize control of multiple computers remotely, providing them access to personal information as well as the ability to remotely install malware to engage in advertising fraud, entirely unbeknownst to the computer's true owner".

Internet advertising revenues in 2015 were estimated at $59.6bn - but say the duo "many of the purchased ads are not reaching their intended audience, instead, they are being intercepted by botnets".

Maintain Schumer and Warner: "Bots plague the digital advertising space by creating fake consumer traffic, artificially driving up the cost of advertising in the same way human fraudsters can manipulate the price of a stock by creating artificial trading volume."

Last month, the World Federation of Advertisers predicted that by 2025, fake Internet traffic schemes will be second only to the cocaine and opiate markets as a form of organised crime.

Read the original unabridged Foxbusiness.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: www.foxbusiness.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6930

Internet Fast Lane Proposal 'Built on Bribes', Says Web Founder

Trend Summary: The so-called 'Father of the Internet' warns that the world wide web is endangered by power-hungry internet service providers.


According to Sir Timothy John Berners-Lee, the English computer scientist who created the World Wide Web, his invention is endangered by profit-hungry Internet Service Providers [ISPs] who stand to wield an unacceptable level of power over a medium intended by Sir Tim to be a decentralised network in which no single entity could ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q3 2014 onward]

... dictate outcomes to everyone else.

Berners-Lee criticised ISPs and other opponents of net neutrality regulation who argue that applying restrictions on their activities is tantamount to regulating the Internet.

Not so says Berners-Lee, who posits that there's a fundamental difference between regulating the providers of broadband and government oversight of the services that run on top of it. He argues that strong net neutrality rules would help preserve the line dividing the two, thereby limiting the incentive of ISPs to meddle in the market for services.

Sir Tim cites the US market as an example. "A lot of congressmen say 'Well, sign up for the free market', and feel that it's just something you should leave to go by itself."

Berners-Lee disagrees. "Well yeah, the market works well so long as nobody prints money. So we have rules, okay? You don't steal stuff, for example. The US dollar is something that everyone relies on. So the government keeps the dollar a stable thing, nobody steals stuff, and then you can rely on the free market."

He recalls that when he first created the Web, he took the telephone wire coming out of his wall, plugged it into his computer and could instantly connect to any other computer. He didn't have to ask his telephone company's permission to introduce a new feature, he wryly noted.

But the rules currently under review by the Federal Communications Commission, would tacitly allow ISPs to charge content companies for priority access to consumers, and change how easily inventors could spread their ideas.

In such a future, Berners-Lee warns, new technologies and companies might crop up faster in countries other than the US  if services were forced to "bribe" their way to success.

Read the original unabridged WashingtonPost.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WashingtonPost.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6408

Internet Usage Declines in Wake of Snowden Revelations

Trend Summary: Internet usage is contracting in the wake of  last year's revelations of eavesdropping and surveillance by US government agencies.


The exposure last year by dissident Edward Snowden of the US government's online survellance of its own citizens - and those of allied nations - may have contributed to to a significant decline in internet usage, according to a report published this week by Nielsen-owned Harris Interactive. Following Snowden's exposure of the National Security Agency's phone and internet surveillance, a poll of over 2,000 people revealed that  ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2014 onward]

... significant numbers are sending less email, curtailing their online shopping and banking, and generally being more careful about what they do online.

Comments Stephen Cobb, a researcher at security company ESET which sponsored the Harris study: “I think we are seeing something significant here. I don’t recall the internet going backward at any other time.”

Of the 2,000+ respondents to the Harris survey:

  • 47% said that they have “changed their behavior and think more carefully about where they go, what they say, and what they do online.”
     
  • 26% said they are shopping less online. Among people aged 18-34, 33% said they were doing less online shopping.
     
  • 29% of women said they were doing less shopping online, compared with 23% of men and 26% overall.
     
  • 29% of people aged 18-34 said they had reduced online banking.
     
  • 24% of respondents said they were “less inclined to use email.”

According to Mr Cobb: “I don’t think people have short attention spans on this topic, and this news is ongoing. This is historic."

"Twenty years from now, when people say ‘do you remember those privacy issues,’ the answer is going to be yes. This is on par with Watergate. We are seeing reforms and legislation emerging, just like Watergate.”

Read the original unabridged Blogs.WSJ.com article.

 


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Blogs.WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6302

Web Guru Demands Online 'Magna Carta'

Trend Summary: Sir Tim Berners-Lee, founder of the world wide web, this week warned that the system is under increasing attack from governments and corporations alike.


Speaking to The Guardian newspaper yesterday, Sir Tim Berners-Lee said that new rules are needed to protect the "open, neutral" system, urging that an online "Magna Carta" is needed to protect and enshrine the independence of the medium he created back in 1989. He also urged that action be taken to ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2014]

.. protect the rights of web users worldwide.  

"We need a global constitution – a bill of rights", he said.

Sir Tim's "Magna Carta" plan is part of a wider initiative called "The Web We Want". This urges people in each and every nation to generate a digital bill of rights – a statement of principles he hopes will be supported by public institutions, government officials and corporations.

Warns the web guru: "Unless we have an open, neutral internet we can rely on without worrying about what's happening at the back door, we can't have open government, good democracy, good healthcare, connected communities and diversity of culture.

"It's not naive to think we can have that, but it is naive to think we can just sit back and get it."

In the wake of revelations by whistleblower Edward Snowden regarding the illicit activities of America's National Security Agency, Berners-Lee has been an outspoken critic of the US and UK spy agencies' surveillance of citizens.

In the light of what has emerged, he said, people are looking for an overhaul of how the security services are overseen.

Sir Tim's views also echo across the technology industry, where there is particular anger about the efforts by the NSA and Britain's GCHQ to undermine encryption and security tools – something many cybersecurity experts say has been counterproductive and undermined everyone's security.

Read the original unabridged TheGuardian.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: The Guardian.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6286

EU Slams US Government and UN Over Internet Control

Trend Summary: The European Union has declared its opposition to control of the internet by the US government and/or the United Nations.


Neelie Kroes, the European Union's former Commissioner for Competition and Technology, now EU vice president, has staked-out the trade bloc's stance over reforming the internet’s infrastructure. Governance of the internet, Ms Kroes believes, should not be in the hands of the United States or United Nations. Instead,she argues that control should be shared by ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q1 2014 onward]

... individual governments, companies, civil society and others.

Outlining the EU executive's position vis-a-vis oversight of the internet, Ms Kroes told reporters: “The debate is happening at a time of broken trust, not least because of surveillance scandals, and at a time when many governments want to take more control of the internet. We are rejecting a United Nations takeover or governmental takeover of internet governance.”

The EU's position, according to Ms Kroes, is that recent revelations of large-scale surveillance have called into question the stewardship of the USA with regard to internet governance.

She posits that in order to “broker a smooth transition to a more global model, while at the same time protecting the underlying values of open multi-stakeholder governance of the internet,” who better than Europe to find the middle ground between the US and those authoritarian nations that prefer to crack down on internet freedom?

“Internet governance is going to rise up the political agenda over the next two years,” she said, which would be “make or break” for the open internet as we know it."

“We don’t need government control. What we need is to globalise the current multistakeholder model.”

Read the original unabridged WSJ.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6263

'Native Marketing' Deception Alarms FTC

Bottom Line Trend: The Federal Trade Commission has warned advertisers it will vigorously enforce its rules controlling Native Advertising.


So-called 'Native Advertising' - ads that appear in online and offline publications, masquerading as news stories or editorial features - have received a stern warning from US regulatory body, the Federal Trade Commission. Native advertising has recently grown more aggressive, especially online. The practice enables brands to target specific audiences and individuals, also to get ... 

[Estimated timeframe: Q4 2013 onward]

... instant feedback when consumers react to what has been displayed. 

There's nothing new about such practices. Three or four decades ago door-to-door salesmen portrayed themselves as opinion pollsters; these days web pages masquerade as unbiased magazine articles. Even when such information is openly labelled as advertising, consumers are frequently misled. 

Addressing several hundred advertisers, academics and media executives at a conference on Native Advertising earlier this week, FTC chairwoman Edith Ramirez conceded that "the delivery of relevant messages and cultivating user engagement are important goals. That is the point of advertising.”

FTC officials said recent surveys of online publishers revealed that 73% offer native advertising opportunities on their sites, while an additional 17% are considering doing so this year.

Some 41% of brands and one-third of advertising agencies currently use such methods, the FTC reports.

According to Chris Laird, marketing director for brand operations at Procter & Gamble, sponsored content enables the company to “immediately measure the impact it is having on our business.”

Vigorous discussion during the conference made it clear that advertisers and marketers are loath to label an “advertisement” as such.

Says Robert Weissman, president of consumer advocacy group Public Citizen: "The word ‘advertisement’ tells people what is being done to them. The whole point of the word ‘sponsored’ is to avoid calling it what it is."

However, David J Franklyn, University of San Francisco law school professor, said preliminary results from his research showed that as many as 35% of the consumers in groups he has studied could not identify an advertisement even when it said “advertisement” on it.

While roughly half of the survey sample indicated they did not know what the word “sponsored” meant.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: NYT.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6222

US Government Heeds 'Native Advertising' Concerns

Bottom Line Trend: So-called 'native advertising' looks to be the marketing industry's 'Next Big Thing'.


The fact that the US government is about to take an active interest in 'Native Advertising' suggests that this melange of ads with editorial content is likely to face a controversial future. This week the first rumblings of government interest [and possible intervention] emerged when the Federal Trade Commission announced it will host a workshop on native ads in Washington DC on December 4. The event will invite representatives from the publishing and advertising industries, as well as ... 

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2013 onward]

... consumer advocates and industry organisations.

Entitled "Blurred Lines: Advertising or Content?”, the workshop will examine:

  • The ways that native ads are presented to consumers 
  • Consumers understanding of native ads
  • Distinguishing native ads from editorial content. 

Some industry organizations have already acted to create self-regulatory frameworks governing native ads.

In October, the American Society of Magazine Editors released an updated version of its editorial guidelines with new suggestions for best practices related to native advertising.

Among many recommendations, the guidelines advise that native ads “should not use type fonts and graphics resembling those used for editorial content and should be visually separated from editorial content.”

Read the original unabridged MediaPost.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MediaPost.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6208

Technology Set to Replace Online Self-Regulation

Bottom Line: Self-regulation of America's online advertising industry has failed, with advertisers and agencies dependent on technology in the future.


According to Wall Street Journal correpondent John Bussey, the USA's $37 billion online advertising industry has failed miserably in its self-regulatory effort to prevent tracking and enforce personal privacy policies. Moreover, predicts Mr Bussey, it will be the free market, not the US government, that tightens the future screws on adland. Tracking is big business - and not only in the USA - where in 2012 internet ad revenues soared to ...

[Estimated timeframe: Q3 2013 onward]

... $37 billion according to the Interactive Advertising Bureau.

The Federal Trade Commission and consumer groups in the USA - along with the European Commission and national regulatory authorities elsewhere on the globe - have long sought a do-not-track protocol that will guard privacy.

This would give internet users a one-click option to prevent marketing firms and websites from placing cookies on their computers.

But after two years of negotiation and missed deadlines, the effort to find a solution through industry self-regulation collapsed earlier this summer. 

Trade groups such as the US Direct Marketing Association, claim that the privacy issue has already been addressed, citing the Ad Choices icon that appears on internet ads which, if clicked, transfers the user to a site where he/she can opt out of receiving behavioural advertising.

Not everyone is convinced by the DMA's claim. "Technology is going to overtake this process if the process doesn't come up with a solution that allows consumers to opt out of collection of information by third parties," says Jon Leibowitz, who stepped down as head of the Federal Trade Commission this year.

Meantime, browsers such as Apple's Safari already have cookie-blocking capability. It's likely to get refined as consumers and regulators look for better solutions.

And Mozilla's Firefox is working on a more comprehensive default blocking option, although Google's Chrome has [predictably] been slower to join the party.

Read the original unabridged WSJ.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WSJ.com
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6156



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