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New Technology Threatens One in Three UK Jobs

Trend Summary: One third of the UK's extant jobs could be replaced by machines within the next two decades, a new study foresees.


The study, published by the University of Oxford, predicts that over the next twenty years jobs such as repetitive processing, clerical and support services are most at risk of replacement by automation and internet technology. Moreover the employment situation will be exacerbated by jobs paying below £30,000 a year, which are nearly ....

 

... five times more likely to be replaced than those paying £100,000 annually.

The study was commissioned by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Ltd, one of the "Big Four" professional services multinationals (along with PwC, Ernst & Young and KPMG). Deloitte's forecast claims that the trends identified by the survey are already "well under way".

The trend to employment losses is not new and the study notes that jobs such as library assistants, clerks and sales-related occupations, along with travel agents and secretarial positions have already decreased by more than 40% across the UK since 2001.

In their place have come a series of orotund job titles that didn't exist a decade ago. Among the fastest-growing of these globally are such pompous appellations as Tzumba instructor, Social media intern and Data scientist.

Comments the report: "Although the replacement of people by machines is well understood, the scale and scope of changes yet to come may not be".

However, it's not all gloom and doom. The study also found that 40% of UK jobs - such as those in financial services, computing, healthcare, engineering, the arts and media - were at low or zero risk.

Deloitte senior partner Angust Knowles-Cutler warns that the scale of the shift needs to be understood and planned in advance.

According to Knowles-Cutler: "Unless these changes coming in the next two decades are fully understood and anticipated by businesses, policy makers and educators, there will be a risk of avoidable unemployment and under-employment,"

Read the original unabridged BBC.co.uk article.

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2014 - Q4 2034]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

... five times more likely to be replaced than those paying £100,000 annually.

The study was commissioned by Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Ltd, one of the "Big Four" professional services multinationals (along with PwC, Ernst & Young and KPMG). Deloitte's forecast claims that the trends identified by the survey are already "well under way".

The trend to employment losses is not new and the study notes that jobs such as library assistants, clerks and sales-related occupations, along with travel agents and secretarial positions have already decreased by more than 40% across the UK since 2001.

In their place have come a series of orotund job titles that didn't exist a decade ago. Among the fastest-growing of these globally are such pompous appellations as Tzumba instructor, Social media intern and Data scientist.

Comments the report: "Although the replacement of people by machines is well understood, the scale and scope of changes yet to come may not be".

However, it's not all gloom and doom. The study also found that 40% of UK jobs - such as those in financial services, computing, healthcare, engineering, the arts and media - were at low or zero risk.

Deloitte senior partner Angust Knowles-Cutler warns that the scale of the shift needs to be understood and planned in advance.

According to Knowles-Cutler: "Unless these changes coming in the next two decades are fully understood and anticipated by businesses, policy makers and educators, there will be a risk of avoidable unemployment and under-employment,"

Read the original unabridged BBC.co.uk article.

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2014 - Q4 2034]

All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: BBC.co.uk
MTT insight URL: https://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6447