54 Marketing Trends found for Regulation / UK


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New EU Legislation Set to Affect HR Teams

Trend Summary: The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation Act [GDPR] which takes effect in May 2018 will be critical for HR Teams.  


Human Resources - specifically the departments responsible for managing resources related to company employees - will shortly be required to cope with the European Union's looming ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2018]

...  General Data Protection Regulation [GDPR] which will take effect in May 2018.

It’s fair to say that legislation has failed to keep pace with the speed at which technology and big data has advanced – particularly the ability of a company to gather, store and analyse data.

GDPR is specifically intended to enhance data protection and the right of EU citizens to privacy, giving them greater control over their personal data and its use by marketers.

The new Act represents a complete overhaul of the legal requirements that must be met by any company handling EU citizens’ personal data – and that also includes employees’ personal data.

The implications of GDPR are not to be sneezed at. Companies who fall foul of the regulation and are found to be misusing personal information face stiff fines of up to €20m or 4% of annual worldwide turnover, whichever is the greater of the two.

Read the original unabridged Forbes.com article.

 


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Forbes.com
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7369

Most Marketers Unprepared for EU's Upcoming Data Protection Law

Trend Summary: Most marketers remain unprepared for the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation [GDPR].


One thing is clear as marketers ready themselves for year 2018: They’re not yet prepared for today’s digital transformation - nor are they ready for the European Union's looming ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2017]

... General Data Protection Regulation [GDPR].

According to Cambridge Massachusetts based Forrester Research, 80% of firms affected by the GDPR will not comply by next May.

Moreover, of those non-compliant companies, 50% will intentionally ignore the EU regulation. Predicts Forrester: "Firms have weighed the cost and risk factor and are taking a path that presents the best position for them."

Forrester also predicts that the remaining 50% of companies will try to comply and fail.

Moreover: “The sleeper issue of 2018 will not be compliance but how consumer advocate groups use GDPR to prosecute their agendas by using the regulation’s ‘right to be forgotten’ clause—exhausting companies’ resources and damaging their brands.”

Read the original unabridged Mediapost.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Mediapost.com
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7258

UK Government Urged to Probe Digital Advertising Supply Chain

Trend Summary: A leading media trade body has urged the UK Government to investigate the digital advertising supply chain.


The News Media Association [NMA], which represents national and local newsbrands in the UK, is requesting the government to take action to ensure that ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2017]

... genuine news outlets can survive. 

According to The Times newspaper, the NMA's request came in a submission to the House of Commons culture committee's inquiry into fake news.

The request comes in the wake of concerns voiced by Procter & Gamble's CMO, Marc Pritchard, as well as a recent Times article about brands unwittingly serving programmatic ads on extremist websites.

Says NMA chairman  Ashely Highfield: "News media publishers are by far the biggest investors in original news content, accounting for 58% of the total UK investment".

He added, however: "But the digital supply chain rewards the distributors of content, not the originators. Government and regulators cannot ignore for ever the impact of the Google-Facebook duopoly on our media landscape".

Read the original unabridged Warc.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: Warc.com
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7118

EU To Introduce Data Time Bomb In 2018

Trend Summary: Customer insights, if gathered and used correctly, can drive marketers strategy and become a key part of operations.


Virtually all  thriving businesses are sitting on a goldmine of information, despite which many are taking unnecessary risks with this data, exposing them to potentially ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2017]

... devastating consequences.

The catalyst for this time bomb is the European Union’s new GDPR [General Data Protection Regulation], which will take effect on 25th May 218.

Under this new regulation, the rights of individuals (including customers and employees) are significantly enhanced, giving them the right to request access to their data plus details as to how it has been processed.

The legislation goes further - much further - than just contact details. It can also include notes from telephone calls or every email sent to and from the company. Moreover companies will be obliged to share this data with the individual free of charge.

Read the original unabridged TalkBusiness.co.uk article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: TalkBusiness.co.uk
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7068

'Gig Economy' on Growth Track Despite Growing Pains

Trend Summary: Uber and Airbnb undergo growing pains as 'gig economy' matures.


San Francisco headquartered global online transportation network Uber Technologies Inc is reeling in the wake of last week's decision by a UK court that it could not classify its drivers as self-employed and must therefore ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q4 2016]

...  pay them the national living wage plus holiday pay and other employment benefits.

The court's ruling could also extend to another highflying online business, the worldwide accommodations site Airbnb.

Commenting on ther court's decision, Andy Hood, head of emerging technologies at global digital ad agency agency AKQA opined: "Technology innovation is ahead of behaviour and behaviour is ahead of legislation".

Mr Hood also maintains that "current laws do not apply well to the gig economy", adding that "people who provide the services that platforms like Uber and Airbnb offer are not really ‘self-employed’ as we would normally understand that term, nor full-time employees – but something in-between".

Moreover, says Hood: "The gig economy (an environment in which temporary positions are common and organisations contract with independent workers for short-term engagements) will be in a state of flux until global legislation catches up with what amounts to a new class of worker."

Read the original unabridged CampaignLive.co.uk article.
 


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: CampaignLive.co.uk
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=7024

Watchdog Warns Brands to Beware of Hidden Online Ads

Trend Summary: The UK Advertising watchdog has declared war on undisclosed advertising in online publications and blogs.


In a bid to repair consumers’ trust in online content Britain's Competition and Markets Authority [CMA] has announced its intention to tackle undisclosed advertising in online publications and blogs, and to ramp up awareness among marketers, publishers and bloggers of ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2016]

... the implications of doing so.

The announcement follows hard on the heels of the CMA's finding that Starcom Mediavest and TAN Media had arranged for endorsements in online articles and blogs without making it clear the content was advertising.

Paid endorsements aren't a new issue: the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 has always banned the use of editorial content in publications and other media to promote products for which publishers pay without disclosing the tactic to consumer audiences.

The CMA is likely to continue to make examples of brands in order to bring about industry-wide change. Brands and marketing companies should not ignore the CMA’s actions and guidelines, but seek to understand them fully to ensure that their content marketing strategies remain effective, whilst maintaining the consumer trust which is ultimately vital to their bottom lines.

Read the original unabridged WallBlog.co.uk article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: WallBlog.co.uk
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6948

New EU Law Will Regulate Marketers Use of Data

Trend Summary: The European Commission yesterday approved more stringent data privacy laws.


The General Data Protection Regulation [GDPR hereon] runs to more than two hundred pages, making it one of the most wide-ranging EU reforms to be passed in years. It also formalises ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2018]

... concepts such as the ‘right to be forgotten’, data portability, data breach notification and accountability.

Companies falling foul of the GDPR guidelines could face massive fines of €20m, or up to four per cent of global revenues.

Businesses operating within the EU will need to be more transparent with their use of personal data, while individuals will have more control of their personal information.

The new bill means that marketers, increasingly reliant on data, will be compelled to rethink their consumer data practices and move more deftly come 2018 when GDPR comes into force.

Read the original unabridged The Drum.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: TheDrum.com
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6877

eMail Marketers Face Tighter Regulation

Trend Summary: The European Union this week agreed to implement new regulations for data sharing and protection.


In a move that will profoundly affect eMail marketers, the European Parliament this week passed the General Data Protection Regulation bill [GDPR] giving member states two years to comply with the regulation and incorporate the GDPR into their own ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q2 2015 - Q4 2018]

... national laws.

The GDPR bill, however, is not as draconian as it first may seem, allowing eMail marketers a period of grace until March 2018 to comply with the new email and data protection laws.

The new regulation will also affect anyone sending emails to or from subscribers residing in member states of the European Union.

A press release from the European Commission states that complying with the bill will likely be more difficult for marketers as it enables EU citizens to “better control their personal data”.

The release continues: “At the same time modernised and unified rules will allow businesses to make the most of the opportunities of the Digital Single Market by cutting red tape and benefiting from reinforced consumer trust.”

Read the original unabridged MediaPost.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: MediaPost.com
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6793

Adland Slammed by Mothers Union for Commercialisation of Childhood

Trend Summary: In what might prove a serious blow to the UK's ad industry, Mothers' Union has publicly condemned the commercialisation of childhood.


Earlier this week the UK branch of Mothers’ Union asked members of the General Synod of The Church of England to heed concerns voiced by parents about the impact of advertising and commercialism on children and the consequent ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q3 2015 onward]

... well-being of the family.

In a debate chaired by the Rt Revd David Thomson, Bishop of Huntingdon, Mothers’ Union [MU] raised awareness of their Bye Buy Childhood campaign and called upon the Lords Spiritual to raise in Parliament the recommendations drafted by MU based on its recent research.

According to Rachel Aston, Social Policy Manager at MU: “Despite significant progress since our original research in 2010, we know that only 50% of parents feel equipped to manage the significant influence of advertising and the commercial world on their family."

"We want to ensure that parents are empowered to manage the impact of commercialisation, and that government continues to ensure that regulation is working and that industry follows the spirit, as well as the letter of the law when marketing and selling to children.”

Ian Barber, Director of Communications for the Advertising Association, represented the ad industry at the event. He assured those present: “When it comes to children’s well-being, everybody must be ready to play their part.

"The Mother’s Union has inspired a positive debate in our sector and UK advertising is committed to ensuring that marketing to children continues to be responsible and appropriate. Industry initiatives like Media Smart, created to help teachers and parents talk to children about advertising, are a great example of how we can make a real difference.”

Read the original unabridged AnglicanNews.org article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AnglicanNews.org
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6674

EU to Curb Google's Advertising Dominance

Trend Summary: European Union regulators clamp down on Google, Facebook and other US invaders of personal privacy.


Last week Google became the latest (and arguably the hardest hit) of major US online businesses trading within the European Union, following the latter's decision to investigate Larry, Sergei and Eric's monolithic monster on allegations of anti-trust practices, specifically its ...

[Estimated timeframe:Q1 2015 onward]

... favouring, to the detriment of rivals, of Google's own web properties in search results .

Another of Google's current practices under investigation by the EU is the delivery of instant product reviews, thereby diverting traffic away from rivals such as Yelp.

According to an article by Garrett Sloane in today's AdWeek.com, punitive action by the EU could force Google to change its search tactics. Additionally, the probe could also veer into other aspects of its business that impact upon advertising.

Back in 2013, when the US Federal Trade Commission conducted a full investigation into Google's alleged business practices, the commissioners declined to label Google a search monopoly whilst, nevertheless, continuing to maintain a close watch on the company's commercial behaviour. 

Said FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz: “The changes Google has agreed to make will ensure that consumers continue to reap the benefits of competition in the online marketplace and in the market for innovative wireless devices they enjoy.”

It appears that the EU is now adopting a similar stance.

Read the original unabridged AdWeek.com article.


All data sources are attributed with links to the original insight. The insight is then summarised and, where appropriate, enhanced with additional information.

Source: AdWeek.com
MTT insight URL: http://www.marketingtrendtracker.com/article.aspx?id=6568



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